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Tech support Repair reports, Fixed anything? post the a report on it.
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The following is a repair report on some of my own equipment.
This information may prove useful for others who have experienced the same problems.

"NES power pad repair"


Device:
acc. NES Power Pad.

Device Classification:
Dance Mat

Diagnosis:
Plastics aging, and degrading, becoming stiff and weak, Side A has acquired rips as a result of this caused by standard folding.

pre-Process notes:
I dont have a lot of stuff that will allow a permanent hold and still be flexible on the pad, I will use a swimming pool patch kit and see what happens.
My Father suggested applying silicone lubricant to restore the plastic, i will try this, not much to loose at this point.

Process:
Cleaned entire surface of device using a damp paper towel, and dried.
Applied Vinyl Patches from a swimming pool repair kit over noted rips on side A,
Applied Silicone lubricant liberally over the entire surface of the pad, both sides.
Allowed to set for 24 hours.

Results:
Vinyl Patches set hard, Should allow for an effective permanent hold.
The silicone lubricant made the plastic soft again, has restored its strength, and seems to have taken out some of the yellowing.
Surface of the pad has been made slippery, (need to wash some of the excess lubricant off)
Device functions as designed.

Results notes:
Im quite impressed with the results of the Silicone lubricant.
It actually restored the Pad to Almost "need to break it in" new condition.
I played "World Class Track Meet" for an hour with no new rips occurring, the vinyl patches did not come out either.
Fell on my ass playing hurdles, this freaking thing was made reeeealy slippery.


Chemical notes:
Vinyl Cement contains the chemical Methyl Ethyl Ketone which is Toxic, and highly flammable
Spray Silicone lubricant contains Acetone 67-64-1, Heptane 142-82-5, Dimethylpolysiloxane 63148-62-9 , and Hydrocarbon Propellant 68476-86-8 Which are Toxic, highly flammable, and potentially explosive.
Do not breathe vapors, extinguish all open flames and heat sources.
make sure you have proper ventilation, open all available doors and windows. windows, or process outdoors.
Do NOT smoke while using these chemicals.


---
Edited by: Nite, Mar 1st, 2013 @ 11:38 am

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That was rather interesting. Makes me want to see if my own Power Pad still works.

It's been a few years since I've used swimming-pool repair goop, but man that stuff was powerful.
Course clear! You got a card.
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Bibby
That was rather interesting. Makes me want to see if my own Power Pad still works.

It's been a few years since I've used swimming-pool repair goop, but man that stuff was powerful.

indeed, such is why i included the chemical hazard label.

Otherwise, this is a dead simple process, the silicone lubricant and pool patch kits are both rather cheap to buy,
the results are well worth the money spent, i assure you.

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The following is a repair on my own equipment
I do NOT recommend anybody try the methods used here,
The methods used were deployed only because i lack proper tools.
Were successful, there are a large number of things that can go wrong which could result in Damage to equipment, Damage to tools, personal injury, Risk of fire, Explosion, or death.
neither I, nor Bibby Team, will not be held responsible for anyone who chooses to attempt this.



Device:Playstation 3 (Model 2)

Device Classification: Video Game Console

Diagnosis:
GPU/CPU solder balls have lost their elasticity as a result of overheating, and have cracked, causing motherboard contact to be lost.
Overheating caused by Failure of the Thermal compounds, worsened by dust build up

Process:
Fully dismantled and cleaned the entire inside of the PS3
Removed the motherboard
Removed Bios backup battery
Cleaned old Thermal compound off with acetone.
ran Kester 186 No clean flux underneath the CPU and GPU
Baked Motherboard in a toaster oven at 450F for 10 min to liquify the solder
Allowed to completely cool for over an hour
Applied new thermal compounds,
Reassembled
Ran an experimental home brew application to manually speed up the cooling fan

Results:
System booted up as it should, seems to run fine.

Results Note:
I have no idea how long this will last, Hopefully awhile.
The fan control utility appears to have made a major difference it the temps,
Last time i saw (Via the temperature monitor in Multiman) it was idling at 70c, that is down to an average of 49c.

Chemical notes:
WARNING!
electronic devices are known to contain many hazardous chemicals, including Lead, and Mercury,
entire process should be done OUTSIDE,
Process contaminates the oven used, Do not use in an oven that you intend to cook food in!
Flux is mildly corrosive, may cause skin burns, breathing smoke may cause respiratory harm, Do not get in eyes!
Kester 186 No Clean Flux contains denatured Alcohol, which is highly flammable, and potentially explosive.

Final Notes:
Recommending this method is one big "HELL NO!"
Were I was apparently successful, their are far too many things that can go wrong.
to top it off, I have no idea how long the fix will last. It may well break tomorrow.
Should you choose to try this, Make certain that you research this method thoroughly,
Make certain that you Know what poisons you are handling, and that you are prepared for an emergency
on the event something goes wrong, This includes a fully stocked first aide kit, knowing the local emergency phone number
And knowing the phone number for the nearest poison control center and hospital.
YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!


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Edited by: Nite, May 23rd, 2013 @ 8:03 pm

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  • Baked Motherboard in a toaster oven
  • contain[s] Mercury
  • should be done OUTSIDE
  • mildly corrosive
  • highly flammable, and potentially explosive


Yeah, those are some good reasons to steer clear of this project unless you're 100% sure you know what you're doing. Interesting read, by the way.
Course clear! You got a card.
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Bibby
  • Baked Motherboard in a toaster oven
  • contain[s] Mercury
  • should be done OUTSIDE
  • mildly corrosive
  • highly flammable, and potentially explosive


Yeah, those are some good reasons to steer clear of this project unless you're 100% sure you know what you're doing. Interesting read, by the way.

exactly.
And thanks :)

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Sorry for the bump: But there is an update on that PS3.

After nearly 3 YEARS, it happened again.
Same problem, same fix worked, It's back up and running.

This was actually far better than I had expected, considering that the PS3, out of the box, lasted less than 1 year.

However, I still wonder how long it will last this time around.

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Edited by: Nite, Jan 20th, 2016 @ 10:51 pm

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This isn't a repair per se, but when Windows 10 installed a major update in November, I found that various applications were no longer able to launch. These applications included Microsoft SQL Server, which I needed for my job, and Terraria, an awesome game that I spent way too much time playing.

When I tried to run SQL Server, I received an error message saying that certain DLLs (such as MSVCP100.dll) were missing. One widely-recommended solution was to download those DLLs and place them in your SysWow64 folder. This is not a good idea - these DLLs are typically included with other applications and libraries, which these same DLLs depend on. There's a chance this solution could fix the problem, but it might not fix other dependency issues. In my case, I just got a different error message when I downloaded these DLLs and stuck them in SysWow64.

After trying oodles of possible solutions, it turns out that all I needed to do was re-download the 32-bit version of the Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable Package and repair the current installation of Microsoft Visual C++. This was not a very intuitive solution. Even though I have a 64-bit operating system and a 64-bit version of SQL Server, apparently the application still depended on this 32-bit library. Once I repaired Visual C++, everything ran just fine.
Course clear! You got a card.
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Device:
RCA Cambio 2-in-1 tablet computer

Classification:
Touchscreen tablet computer.

Diagnosis:
I Threw it off the sofa. Digitizer surface cracked due to a hard impact, rendering it useless.

Fix:
Was a fairly straightforward procedure, involving only a partial tear down, and replacing the broken surface.
A heat gun was used to loosen the adhesive on the broken part, so that it could be carefully pulled up, by prying up, and cutting with a guitar pick. once fully cut, the old surface came out without a problem, and the new one was installed using the adhesive supplied.

Notes:
It should go without saying, that screen components are made out of glass, this goes for the touchscreen surface, as well as the monitor. These are very fragile, and are exceedingly sharp when broken. Caution should be used when replacing these components.
When using a heat gun, be careful not to leave it in one area for too long, as this could warp, or liquefy the plastic around the tablet, making it impossible to put back together.
When working near, on, or removing an LCD, be extra careful that you don't slip, and break it.
As noted before: These are made out of glass, and are very fragile.

Always handle broken display components as if handling broken glass, even if no cracks, or shards are visible.

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Edited by: Nite, Jan 24th, 2016 @ 11:18 pm

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Device:
Super Nintendo

Classification:
Video Game Console

Diagnosis:
Internal components were damaged due to an unforeseen short circuit across several undetermined internal components.
Cause was a stray piece of jewelry wire.

Fix:
After fully dismantling the console, I was able to identify components which where burned, and needed replaced Several capacitors, some resistors, and the fuse.
Components were acquired by dismantling a long-dead VCR. de-soldering the components, and re-installing them into the SNES. Finding a matching fuse was a different matter, but I was able to find one at the local hardware store.
After several days of soldering, then giving the unit a complete reflow with a torch and flux, then scrubbing out the 62-pin connector with a toothbrush and alcohol. and re-calibrating the Video-out potentiometer (Almost literally everything that could have been wrong with this d*** thing!) I was able to get the unit working again. Tested with two SNES rom boards I found on the highway which I am working on, an SD2SNES flashcart, and a Super Gameboy + EverdriveGB flashcart.

Notes:
I do NOT recommend the what I have done here, if only for the fact that I was only going by what components look like, with the exception of the fuse.
I have no idea how much amperage the capacitors used store, nonetheless the actual impedance of the resistors, I am no less happy that this bout of mad science has worked out so swimmingly well however. I would not be so reckless with a unit I am working on for someone else.

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